NATURE’S WISDOM IN HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS

NATURE’S WISDOM IN HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS

EYES THAT SEE COLOR

              Camille Flammarion, L’Atmosphere: Météorologie Populaire (Paris, 1888) 

What is our

obsessive fear

of dying and death

revealing about

our perspective of

life?

 

Nature’s

Way

deserves our

response.

Nature’s wisdom

affirms birth

and life,

and death.

Every particle

and DNA imprint

point to the

remarkably foreseeable

cycles of

birth and death.

Let us cure cancer.

Let us cure

whatever kills us;

let us extend the

perimeters of

physical life

and see what we

come up with.

Whatever we do

to avoid the

inevitability of

impermanence,

whatever we accomplish

to extend ourselves

beyond the natural

course of Nature,

will reap

the best and worst

that we can imagine.

While we live longer,

we may at the same time

create demands beyond

our present

capacity

to sustain the balance.

What is enough?

What does it mean

to die

“of natural causes”

and accept dying

as a timely gift,

as a privilege,

an open door to

More?

When and if

we learn to

live longer,

we must also learn

how to love and heal

and listen to

one another

with heartening precision.

When we

overpopulate

our global family

and expand beyond the planet

for additional

sustenance,

will technology

and consciousness

unite with

science and faith,

navigating our course

through the unknown

and uncharted waters

of the future?

Will humanity

continue to become

better and worse

at the same time?

Will time itself

speed up

as it syncs

with the

myriad

possibilities

of infinite

downloads of information,

imbuing

psyche, body

and society?

Our perception of

Alpha and Omega–

the beginning

and the end of things–

continually grows;

the metamorphosis

and transmutations

of motives

and motion

flash rapidly

before us.

We observe with

wonder and awe

the way things

were, and are,

and may become.

The Mystery

and magic of

life and death

excite,

haunt,

and challenge us

as we suffer through,

and celebrate with,

our daily, mundane

and extraordinary

lives.

At the expanding extremes

of our state-of-the-art

microscopes

and

telescopes

we venture forward,

inward, outward,

into unknowing

and into knowing

at the same time.

Great light

and great darkness

embrace

total presence

and total absence

of visible

and invisible

things.

The opposites

compound more and less

at the same time.

We stand in

in the disclosing

pages of

sheer awe

and wonder,

cooing before our

cradles of birth

and crying at our

coffins of death.

Let us

stand over our

graves and

laugh and weep

with joy and grief,

embracing

the whole

spectrum of

human existence.

Meanwhile,

the ancient stars,

born from

black holes of time,

sparkle

beyond their own demise

in

tonight’s sky.

 

-Hal Edwards

Wauconda, IL

April 5, 2013

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